02 March 2010

Student artwork critique - Morgan

Morgan - Round Like a Record

This piece portrays the 1980's and its inpact on youth. The record shape represents the new technology of the era; techno and synthesized music became prominent. In the background, the polka dots beneath the newspaper clearly show the bubble gum "pop" concentration. The layer of newspaper and use of mere comics and puzzles shows how the youth tried to break away from the political distress of the time by exploring foreign concepts such as time travel, space exploration, and other sci-fi ideals. The silver watercolor also portrays the technology that creates a silver sheen on society, and the fears of computer take-over. I am pleased with my craftmanship, but the composition, while made of many layers, lacks a concrete subject matter.

Leave your comments below.

10 comments:

Tabitha said...

This piece is very interesting to me because of the design element you focused on, which was shape. The circles, squares, and varied sizes of rectangles create contrast in order to bring out the focal point, which appears to be the record. The color choice for the record, red, also has the same effect. Although I do admire how you incorporate shape into this piece, I wish you had worked more with the record as a focal point.

Karinda said...

When first looking at the piece I found it very abstract and simple. However the meaning you hold behind you art is great. The use of the many layers works for you, as it creates an interesting composition that helps the eye move around the page but stay focused on the circle. The use of the contrasting cool colors and warm colors balances the piece as the blues and silvers are used in the background separated by the neutral black and white (the newspaper) bringing the warm colors to full attention. The use of line and shape are important in the piece as they along with the color help the work to be a good piece. The significant color change also shows the change in time and I like how the colors to represent the 1920s are lively involving to the period’s feelings.

Karinda said...

Tabitha,
after reading your post I was slightly wondering on how you would say the record could be worked on more as a focal piece. Do you think it should be outlined with poossibly black to make it stand out alittle more from the background? I completley agree with you because as I look again it seems to almost need a touch of something.

Caroline said...

Your idea behind this piece is very well thought out and detailed. The way that you incorporated all of the historical aspects of music and youth at the time, and the way that they were visualy portrayed, was extremely well done. I really like the contrasting red, blue, and yellow/orange colors used in this piece with against the newspaper background. Also,I like how you added texture to your artwork through the CD record. This is a really well done piece.

Katherine said...

The layers of various materials really emphasize pattern and repetition here, which is a nice way to bring out your simple composition and geometric shapes. Keeping with a concise color scheme was a nice choice. However, my eyes are in conflict because shapewise the focal point is the circle and its dynamic movement; but color wise, the yellow streaks stand out a lot more. Either increasing emphasis in the record or diluting the yellow would help make this piece even better.

Dianna said...

I love how the orange is not a completely pure color. You went across the full range of the orange/yellow spectrum and that really helps move the eye along. Also, their placement in the composition gives that nice retro-technological feel you wanted to emanate.

Now, as much as I would like to say that cutting all those strips of newspapers is a feat in itself -and is quite tedious I could tell-, I think if they were straighter, it would not only improve the piece but also emphasize that 'perfection' technology tries to achieve.

But overall, like the others have said, I absolutely adore the concept behind this.

Morgan said...

Thank you all for your input. I agree with Katherine, my use of color conflicts the focal point of shape and the focal point of color. If I had done the record in yellow, it would have been a much sharper focal point.

To Caroline: The nature of working in layers develops some great textures almost accidentally. This adds interest to pieces, but it can also put a roadblock in the process because other media need to be used to carry out the design. For example, the yellow stripes were supposed to be painted on. If I painted it, there would have been an odd texture in the yellow, and it wouldn't have been as bold as I liked. Instead, I had to cut strips of paper to glue on top.
To Dianna: You present a very good point. I was advised to not do them equal size and shape, interestingly enough, and it seems to be just a matter of opinion.

Tabitha said...

Karinda, at first, I thought that the record could have been designed more intricacy and complexity, but I realized it would take away from the wonderful simplicity that has already been established. But, I have to agree with what Katherine offered; the record could have been more of the focus if the color was the boldest in comparison to the yellow streaks.

Tabitha said...

Karinda, at first, I thought that the record could have been designed more intricacy and complexity, but I realized it would take away from the wonderful simplicity that has already been established. But, I have to agree with what Katherine offered; the record could have been more of the focus if the color was the boldest in comparison to the yellow streaks.

Chris said...

The 1980's, I love it! I think the layout of the colour choice of this piece really spoke to the time period you were going for. The mix of the futuristic silver's and sleek lines of orange (beautiful shade of orange by the way) with the eye-catching swirl of red that makes up the record really converge and create an interesting and eye-catching composition. It moves the eye around. I enjoy the fact that you made the silvery lines askew, as it can be seen as emphasizing the issues with the scientific focus of the age. However, it seems to off-put the 80's feel of the piece, as the 80's were quite a geometric year for both art and architecture, and the oddly askew likes don't fit into that style. And the title is quite fitting, as it links to a song that helps show off the synth-y tones of the symbolic record.